Wednesday, May 2, 2012

Novelty

Jacob is a funny kid.  He's definitely quirky.  One thing that stood out to me for a long time was that he didn't get genuinely excited by too many things.  He's always been one to take things in and observe.  In the last year or so, he's begun to get more excited about certain things.  A lot of it revolves around opportunities to go outside and play sports with Craig.  He's super-excited to go with Craig to the arena tomorrow, prior to Knighthawks practice.  They'll have the turf to themselves, and he's been excited about it since the possibility arose the other day.  However, I still feel like his excitement is hard to come by.  I think it's part of the reason I want to have a girl next time around, because they tend to get all squealy and excited (ok, not loving the squealy part, but it seems to go hand-in-hand with girly excitement) all the time.  And I love that.

Today I read a blog post by Matt Logelin, who I mentioned here last year after I read his book.  His wife passed away the day after giving birth to their daughter, and three years later his book was published.  Four years later he has an amazing little four year old and he wrote a blog post about taking her to a Dodgers game.  He hyped it up all week, and other than a couple minor hiccups, it went well.  The passion within each of them was so fantastic to read about.  It almost made me realize that I wished I could go back in time and take Jacob to less games so he'd be more excited about them now.  I know that's probably a little silly, because I really appreciate those times and I'm not sure it would make a difference now anyway.  Going to games just seemed like a natural part of our lives, particularly since it gave us a little extra chance to see Craig in the midst of busy streaks of games.  But being able to have the sports experience be a novelty now, when he's more capable of excitement, would be cool.

Last night I was actually having a similar conversation with a work associate of Craig's.  Last night was his annual fundraiser, Tip-A-Knighthawk.  We won a cool jersey and the charity (CURE Childhood Cancer Association) made a couple thousand dollars.  The representative from CURE is a great guy, and he even brought Jacob and me some lacrosse shirts from an event he did.  Later in the evening we were chatting, and he said something about Jacob having quite the life...meaning, the opportunity to meet players and go to games on a regular basis.  I agreed and said that I do try to remind Jacob once in a while that his opportunity to go to games is very special, that not all kids get to do things like that.  Whenever he shies away from the players, I tell him that they want to talk to him and that should be a really cool thing, so he should really take advantage and talk back to them while he can.  The two of us exchanged cherished sports experiences from our childhoods--his two Yankees games a year with his dad, my annual Sabres game.  There was such an excitement for those, and it's really something Jacob doesn't have a concept of because he's so used to going to games. 
Our new jersey, a Rochester Greywolves (semi-pro team) jersey with former Knighthawk Pat Cougevan's name on the back.  The bottom of the jersey is the Rochester skyline, which I love.  Jacob even pointed out my work building right away!  With him is a Knightingale dancer who was helping out with the raffles.
I guess it just forces us to up the ante and try to expose him to other, new sports experiences.  I suppose that's why we try to hit up games in other places--be it a baseball game on vacation, a lacrosse game in Toronto, this past winter's Sabres game, or a couple different college games.  That excitement is in there somewhere, but we need to get him out of his element enough to bring it out.  It's no small challenge, but when it happens, it's worth every effort we made to get there.  That smile and excited giggle inspire me to be a better mother and remind me to see the world through his eyes...because the view is much better from there.

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